Transition to cloud disrupts security market

Four factors creating drastic changes to security software
Deborah Kish, principal research analyst at Gartner
Deborah Kish, principal research analyst at Gartner

Share

The overall security market is undergoing a period of disruption due to the rapid transition to cloud-based digital business and technology models that are changing how risk and security functions deliver value in an organisation, according to Deborah Kish, principal research analyst at Gartner. "At the same time, the threat landscape and rise in the number of high-impact security incidents are also creating demand for security technologies and innovations that deliver greater effectiveness," he adds.

The research advisory, Gartner highlights four main factors which are responsible for the massive transformation in the security software market. These are: use of advanced analytics, expanded ecosystems, adoption of software as a service (SaaS) and managed services, and the prospect of punitive regulations. 

By 2020, advanced security analytics will be embedded in at least 75 per cent of security products, according to Gartner predictions. Enterprises are increasingly seeking products that incorporate "smarter" predictive and prescriptive analytic technologies, which help warn users of potential security incidents and provide guidance on optimal responses.  Successful vendors will work with customers and prospects to understand use cases where analytics will deliver significant value and augment limited security staff and resources.

Given the preponderance of startups and smaller vendors pursuing innovative approaches to security problems, acquisition, integration and consolidation are highly effective strategies to increase market share and enter completely new markets. In many cases, mature vendors in search of continued growth are acquiring faster-growing companies from emerging adjacent markets. In other cases, vendors are optimising profits by consolidating similar products under a single brand, therefore leveraging economies of scale by combining core functions, such as development, support, sales and marketing.

Security buyers are making security product investment decisions that support digital business, fit their current challenges and deliver performance value. Gartner's recent end-user security spending survey indicates that, in order to do this, they have a preference for products in an as-a-service format. SaaS for security and risk management is becoming critical as customers transition to digital business practices. However, providers must consider the financial implications of maintaining support for legacy security products while investing in an as-a-service product or managed service.

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into effect on May 25, 2018 and could see organisations facing heavy fines should they receive a single complaint for mishandling private data. Consequently, enterprises will look to providers with products that provide the needed visibility and control of their data. Providers should identify the key regulatory requirements and constraints in target geographies by working with legal counsel to deliver product and service choices that will alleviate board-level fears.

 

Editor's Choice

The robots are coming: Impact of AI on executive search
As the technology industry’s elite struggle to agree on the potential impact of AI and a raft of people queuing up to advise on the potential disruption it will cause, this article by John Curtis-Oliver, Partner at Boyden studies the potential impact on the executive hiring and the executive search industry.
Saudi Football changes pitch from MBC to STC
The news comes just a few days after the release of Saudi businessman Waleed al-Ibrahim, who has management control of MBC. Reuters reports senior Saudi officials saying that Ibrahim agreed to an “undisclosed settlement after admitting to unspecified violations”.
HetNets: paving the way for “ultraband” age
Over time, telecom operators will provide consumers with a “universal connectivity” service (to rule them all), incorporating Wi-Fi and mobile broadband as a single resource, in an “always best connected” mode, leading to an ultraband connectivity service.

Don't Miss a Story

You may also like

#MWC2018: Spotlight shines on 5G, IoT and AR
Hard to predict what will ‘turn around the fate’ of telecom operators, but there is potential for those who can play the role of enabling platform for new digital services and players, as well as for new features and capabilities across traditional industries, says Luis Cirne, partner, communications, media and technology (CMT) practice at Oliver Wyman
VIVA Bahrain facilitates TRA's SIM registration at UAE Exchange branches
In addition to buying VIVA prepaid recharges and paying post-paid bills, customers can walk into any of the nearest UAE Exchange branch and complete their mandatory biometric registration.
FTA Channel enters new phase in video delivery with SES and MX1
The non-linear distribution service provided through SES's wholly owned subsidiary, MX1, will be the first of its kind in Equatorial Guinea.
9500 RTA taxis in Dubai to get free WiFi by Ramadan 2018
Blackwire deployed KiFi for 7500 TransAD taxis in Abu Dhabi last year and is partnering with SAPO in Japan to help Tokyo become Olympic Games ready