141,000 Kenyan homes now connected to fibre

Safaricom deploys 5,000km of fibre in the African nation
Safaricom has connected over 100,000 homes to its fibre network in Kenya.
Safaricom has connected over 100,000 homes to its fibre network in Kenya.

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Kenyan fixed and mobile operator Safaricom has deployed over 5,000km of fibre-optic cabling, connecting around 141,000 Kenyan households.

The company, which established its consumer broadband unit in May 2017, says it has already hooked up 53,000 homes within its fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) footprint to date, up from 28,000 homes connected (of 91,000 passed) in November 2017.

Safaricom’s home fibre internet network currently covers six towns countrywide and has reached over 20 estates within Nairobi including South B, Pangani, Syokimau in Machakos County, Kitengela, Ngong and Ongata Rongai in Kajiado County. It is also available in Mombasa’s Nyali and Bamburi neighbourhoods, parts of Kisumu, Eldoret and Thika towns.

Safaricom says it has also connected 15,000 business users to direct fibre services, according to its latest financial results document. Safaricom Chief Financial Officer Sateesh Kamath added that the operator has so far connected 1,800 commercial buildings with fibre broadband.

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