McAfee claims gender pay parity

Claims it's the first major cybersecurity company to do so.
McAfee, Women, Equality, Pay gap, Gender pay gap, Business, Tech, Society

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McAfee claims to have achieved gender pay parity.

McAfee, the device-to-cloud cybersecurity company, has claimed it has achieved global gender pay parity - and is allegedly the first major cybersecurity company to do so.

“We value the innovation, creativity, and strategic problem-solving that flourish in an inclusive and diverse environment,” said Christopher Young, McAfee CEO.

“We believe in the simple fact that every employee, regardless of their gender identity, should be compensated fairly and equally for their individual contribution to the company. I’m proud to lead a company that puts actions behind its beliefs and makes gender pay parity a reality for all employees.”

Through an extensive audit covering 45 countries and more than 7,000 employees, McAfee claims it identified gender pay gaps in nine countries. Closing the gap required an investment of $4 million. According to the company, salary adjustments were made on April 1, 2019, and the company will continue to monitor and address pay parity annually.

“By achieving gender pay parity at McAfee, we continue to live our values, build an inclusive culture, create better workplaces, and develop stronger communities. I’m honoured to join companies beyond the world of cyber already striving towards pay parity, and I hope more will join us in reaching this milestone in equality.” said Chatelle Lynch, Chief Human Resources Officer, McAfee.

McAfee defines gender pay parity as fair and equal pay for employees in the same job, level and location, controlling for pay differentiators such as performance, tenure and experience, regardless of gender.

McAfee also released its first Inclusion and Diversity Report, highlighting its strategy and results to support and increase its diverse workforce.

Chatelle Lynch, chief human resources officer at McAfee.

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