Fewer cyberattacks in the UAE

So claims new TRA statistics.
UAE, TRA, CYBERSECURITY, Safety, Online, Internet, Hacking, Web, United Arab Emirates

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Cyberattacks in the United Arab Emirates are declining, according to new statistics from the country’s Telecommunications Regulations Authority (TRA).

TRA stats show cyberattacks against government, semi-government and private sector entities were down 39% in the first seven months of 2018 compared to the same period in 2017.

A total of 274 major cyberattacks were reported.

Much of the decline was attributed to efforts from the Computer Emergency Readiness Team, an organisation responsible for foiling cyberattacks against websites operating in the UAE.

According to the TRA’s stats, which recorded cyberattacks from January to July, there were 150 cyberattacks that caused “medium” damage. Eighty-five were considered “low” damage, while 39 were classified as being critically harmful to their targets.

According to the TRA, all of the attacks were aimed at defacing, blocking, and/or stealing information from websites operating in the UAE.

A total of 31 major cyberattacks were recorded in July 2018, down from 42 in July 2017. Twelve of the attacks were classified as causing medium damage. A further 12 caused low damage. Seven cyberattacks recorded in July were classified as serious.

The stats come amid ongoing efforts by the TRA to educate businesses and the public about the importance of cybersecurity. Efforts including seminars and workshops aimed at educating people about cybersecurity, as well as urging upgrades to the latest security tools.

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