Hungary's Magyar Telekom launches 1Gbps cable broadband

The service is based on DOCSIS 3.1 technology.
Over half a million customers have now chosen its Magenta 1 discount fixed and mobile bundles
Over half a million customers have now chosen its Magenta 1 discount fixed and mobile bundles

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Telecom provider Magyar Telekom of Hungary has launched a 1Gbps/25Mbps (download/upload) HFC cable broadband internet service, doubling its previous fastest cable broadband speed. The service is based on DOCSIS 3.1 technology which Telekom has deployed to 650,000 premises across areas of the country.

This launch boosts the telco's gigabit-speed fixed broadband network footprint to more than 1.7 million homes and businesses, based on direct fiber-optic access and cable. In total, this represents over a third of all business and residential premises in Hungary.  

Magyar Telekom's cable broadband subscriber base reached 411,500 by the end of June this year. This was an increase of 32,700 in twelve months, representing nearly 35 per cent of its total retail broadband subscribers. On the retail fiber side of things, the growth rate is even faster, registering an increase in 72,600 people in a year. With the telco also offering IPTV-over-cable since 2010, traditional cable TV subscribers have dwindled.

Surrounding the announcement, Magyar Telekom's CEO, Tebor Rekasi announced "The recent development allows for offering extra fast internet to our customers via another new technology … in the long run, our objective is to construct gigabit networks in the whole of the country, continuously replacing copper networks."

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